Volume 45 - Number 3 - 2004 | DOI: 10.5032/jae.2004.03053

 

Abstract:

The purpose of this five-year study was to describe the computer experiences, self-efficacy, and knowledge of students (N = 336) entering a college of agriculture, and determine if significant differences existed by year of entry, gender, or the interaction of year and gender. There were few significant differences in computer experiences by year or gender. While there were significant year x gender interactions in some computer-related experiences, no trends were noted. Overall, students had a slightly below average level of computer self-efficacy. The mean self-efficacy of students in the 2002 group was significantly higher than for the 1999 group, although the effect size for year was small. There were no significant differences in computer self-efficacy by gender or by the interaction of year and gender. Students had a fairly low level of computer knowledge. Both overall and by all sub-groupings, mean student scores were below the 50% correct level. Exam scores for students in the 2002 and 2003 student groups were significantly higher than were the scores for the 1999 student group; however, again, the effect size for year was small. There were no significant differences in exam scores by gender or by the interaction of year and gender.

Attachments:
Download this file (45-03-053.pdf)Full Text [ ]1042 kB
Go to top