Coleman, B., Bunch, J., Thoron, A., and Roberts, T. (2020). Examining the effects of reflection type and abstraction order on content knowledge and content knowledge retention during experiential learning. Journal of Agricultural Education, 61(3), 308-320. https://doi.org/10.5032/jae.2020.03308

Experiential learning is fundamental to agricultural education. Current literature indicates some methods of pedagogically implementing experiential learning are more effective than others. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of reflection type and abstraction order on content knowledge and content knowledge retention when teaching experientially. This research experiment was conducted with secondary school students enrolled in agriscience courses. The findings of this study indicated neither the method in which students reflected nor the order in which they received abstraction affected students’ ability to attain content knowledge. However, when analyzing student content knowledge retention, a statistically significant interaction effect indicated reflection type and abstraction order were dependent upon one another. It is recommended those who are interested in knowledge retention outcomes should implement purposeful reflection-on-action techniques when delivering abstract conceptualization prior to an experience.

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